[Events] Two Talks on Audiovisual Translation, University of Sydney

 

Speaker:
Associate Professor Haina Jin, Communication University of China

Time:
23 August, 2018
4–5:30 pm

Location:
SLC Common Room 536,
Brennan MacCallum Building A18, University of Sydney

 

1. AUDIOVISUAL TRANSLATION AND GOING GLOBAL OF CHINESE FILM AND TELEVISION

China has become a major country in film and television production. Since 2011, Chinese governmental agencies began to implement several projects such as “Sino-Africa Film and TV Cooperation Project”, “Silk Road Film Television Bridge Project” to promote the dissemination of Chinese film and television overseas through translation. Meanwhile, Chinese and overseas film and television companies have been increasing their efforts in the translation of Chinese film and television. Thirdly, fansubbing also facilitates the overseas dissemination of Chinese film and television. Fans are one of the most powerful forces for the going global of Chinese film and television, taking their contributions in translation on Mydramalist and Viki as an example. There are three main modes of translating Chinese film and television for overseas market, which are the government-sponsored mode, the commercial mode and the voluntary mode. The translation entities, contents of translation, target audience, broadcast channels and effects of the three translation modes will be discussed in the speech and suggestions for future translation of Chinese film and television for overseas market will also be put forward.

 

2. 2018 SYDNEY CHINESE STUDIES SEMINAR SERIES: FILM TRANSLATION INTO ETHNIC MINORITY LANGUAGES IN CHINA: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

Film translation into ethnic minority languages has been practiced in China since 1950s, which has played important roles in ideological integration, nation building, education, entertainment for ethnic minorities, especially in rural areas. Historically, the development of film translation into ethnic minority languages can be divided into three periods: 1950s to 1965, 1965-2009, and 2009 to the present day. The first period is featured by dubbing in major film studios and oral interpretation by mobile projectionists; the second period is featured by dubbing with coated magnetic recording by film translation centers in inhabitation areas of ethnic minorities. The third period is featured by a coordinated national digital dubbing network of 11 film translation centers for minority languages. Translation policies, translation entities, translation methods, translation sources and the translation functions of each period will be analyzed in the speech.
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